Safemetrics分享 http://blog.sciencenet.cn/u/jerrycueb 以勤奋、谦虚、严谨、规范、持久的习惯和态度做安全科学研究。 'Wonder en is gheen Wonder'

博文

[BooK转载]Individual Behaviour in the Control of Danger

已有 2861 次阅读 2013-4-8 18:26 |个人分类:数据专题|系统分类:科研笔记

Individual Behaviour in the Control of Danger

Andrew R. Hale
Safety Science Group, Delft University of Technology, Delft, The Netherlands*

A. Ian Glendon
Organisational Behaviour and Applied Psychology Division, Aston University,
Birmingham, United Kingdom*

* at the date of publication (1987)

This book is now out of print but you can download it from this page as a set of PDF files. Click on each chapter title below to download a PDF of that whole chapter. Because of the size of the book it is not available as a single file. The contents for each chapter are shown as a guide.

CONTENTS

PREFACEACKNOWLEDGEMENTSCHAPTER 1 INDIVIDUAL BEHAVIOUR AND CONTROL OF DANGER(点击标题直接阅读PDF)

1.1 IMAGES OF THE INDIVIDUAL
1.2 THE SYSTEMS APPROACH
     1.2.1 Systems thinking
1.3 DEFINITIONS OF DANGER
     1.3-1 The meaning of harm
     1.3.2 What is 'potential'
     1.3.4 A working definition
1.4 MODELS OF HARM PROCESS
     1.4.1 The normal state and system design
     1.4.2 Deviation and controls
     1.4.3 Metastable state
     1.4.4 Unstable event
     1.4.5 Damaging event
     1.4.6 Stabilisation
1.5 THE HARM PROCESS AND THE ROLE OF THE INDIVIDUAL
1.6 CONCLUDING REMARKS
1.7 STRUCTURE OF THE BOOK

PART I THE STRUCTURE OF BEHAVIOURCHAPTER 2 MODELS OF BEHAVIOUR IN THE FACE OF DANGER.(点击标题直接阅读PDF)

2.1 MODELS IN BEHAVIOURAL SCIENCE
     2.1.1 Accident proneness model
     2.1.2 Engineering models
     2.1.3 Interactive models
2.2 A SYNTHESIS
     2.2.1 The model: description
     2.2.2 Use of the model

CHAPTER 3 DANGER IN ROUTINE TASKS

3.1 INTRODUCTION
3.2 'ABSENT MINDS'
3.3 THE CONTROL OF ROUTINE ACTIONS
     3.3.1 Types of error
     3.3.2 Predisposing conditions
     3.3.3 Frequency of different error types
3.4 DESIGN FOR ROUTINE TASKS
     3.4.1 'Default values', stereotypes, illusions and other distortions of perception
     3.4.2 Overload on attention and memory
     3.4.3 Unexpected external signals
     3.4.4 Signals to change levels of operation: relationship to the Rasmussen 3 level model
3.5 INSISTENT WARNINGS AND ESCAPE FROM IMMINENT DANGER
     3.5.1 Innate and learned response to emergencies
     3.5.2 Panic
3.6 CONCLUSIONS

CHAPTER 4 HAZARD DETECTION(点击标题直接阅读PDF)

4.1. INTRODUCTION
4.2 ALERTING TO DANGER
     4.2.1 Detection of deviations
     4.2.2 Detecting deviations in dynamic situations
     4.2.3 Enhancing feedback on deviations
4.3 THE OBVIOUSNESS OF DANGER AND THE USE OF WARNINGS
     4.3.1 Hazard symptoms and false alarms
     4.3.2 Clarity, conspicuity and comprehensibility
     4.3.3 Warnings and personal protective equipment
4.4 INSPECTION AND HAZARD SEEKING
     4.4.1 A field study of 'naive' inspectors
     4.4.2 Hazards according to the experienced operator
     4.4.3 Hazard spotting by 'safety' personnel
     4.4.4 Inspection as an active process
     4.4.5 Inspection strategies
4.5 PREDICTING DANGER
4.6 KNOWLEDGE OF CAUSAL NETWORKS
4.7 CONCLUSIONS

CHAPTER 5 DANGER LABELLING AND ASSESSMENT(点击标题直接阅读PDF)

5.1 INTRODUCTION
     5.1.1 labelling
     5.1.2 Acceptability
5.2 CLASSIFICATION OF HAZARDS AND 'SUBJECTIVE RISK'
     5.2.1 Expressed preference research
     5.2.2 Other research approaches
     5.2.3 Structure of the section
5.3 MAJOR HAZARD ASSESSMENT FACTORS
     5.3.1 Choice to enter and leave danger
     5.3.2 Controllability
     5.3.3 Foreseeability
     5.3.4 Vividness, dreadfulness and severity
5.4 HAZARD ASSESSMENT FACTORS AND TYPES OF HARM
5.5 DIFFERENCES IN GLOBAL ATTITUDES TO HAZARDOUS ACTIVITIES
5.6 CONCLUSION
     5.6.1 The classification of hazards
     5.6.2 The place of probability
5.7 EXPECTATIONS AND BIASES; JUDGEMENT IN UNCERTAINTY
     5.7.1 Probability assessment: absolute and relative
     5.7.2 Biases and errors
     5.7.3 Effects of the biases
5.8 CONCLUSIONS: STRATEGIES OF JUDGEMENT

CHAPTER 6 SAFETY AND RESPONSIBILITY(点击标题直接阅读PDF)

6.1 INTRODUCTION
6.2 OPTIONS FOR ACTION
6.3 FIELD STUDIES OF RESPONSIBILITY FOR SAFETY
     6.3.1 Construction site supervisors
     6.3.2 Financial responsibility
     6.3.3 Responsibility for safety and accident prevention
     6.3.4 Responsibility in other environments
     6.3.5 Communication and intervention in the safety of others
     6.3.6. Discussion
6.4 ATTRIBUTION
     6.4.1 Origins of attribution theory
     6.4.2 Attribution of cause and responsibility
     6.4.3 The meaning of 'responsibility'
     6.4.4 Attributing responsibility for own and other's actions
     6.4.5 Locus of control: externals v internals
6.5 DISCUSSION AND CONCLUSIONS

CHAPTER 7 SAFE PLANS AND PROCEDURES(点击标题直接阅读PDF)

7.1 INTRODUCTION
7.2 ACTION TRESHOLDS
7.3 HEURISTICS, PROCEDURES AND PROBLEM SOLVING
7.4 AVAILABILITY OF PLANS
7.5 WEIGHING PROS AND CONS
7.6 MONITORING AND FEEDBACK
7.7 COORDINATION OF ERRORS
7.8 CONCLUSIONS AND PREVENTIVE ACTIONS

PART I AFTERWORDPART II INFLUENCING BEHAVIOURCHAPTER 8 GENERAL PRINCIPLES(点击标题直接阅读PDF)

8.1 INTRODUCTION
8.2 PRINCIPLES OF INTERVENTION
8.3 PRINCIPLES OF BEHAVIOUR MODIFICATION
8.4 STRUCTURE OF PART II
8.5 EVALUATION OF BEHAVIOUR CHANGE AND SAFETY

CHAPTER 9 LEARNING FROM MISTAKES(点击标题直接阅读PDF)

9.1 INTRODUCTION
9.2 FEEDBACK AND MONITORING
     9.2.1 Feedback in routinetasks
     9.2.2 Isolation from feedbacks
     9.2.3 Behaviour modification
9.3 LEARNING AND TRAINING
     9.3.1 What needs to be learned
     9.3.2 How does learning occur? Learning theory
     9.3.3 Sources of learning
     9.3.4 Personal experience: accidents and near misses
     9.3.5 Social modelling
     9.3.6 Development of hazard perception and safe behaviour in young people
     9.3.7 Formal training in safety
9.4 RISK COMPENSATION
     9.4.1 Introduction
     9.4.2 Risk compensation or homeostasis theory
     9.4.3 Predictions from the theory
     9.4.4 Research evidence
     9.4.5 Conclusions

CHAPTER 10 MOTIVATION AND SAFETY(点击标题直接阅读PDF)

10.1 INTRODUCTION
10.2 THEORIES OF MOTIVATION
10.3 VALUES, MOTIVES AND BALANCE
     10.3.1 Theories of motivation
     10.3.2 Motivation and decision
10.4 MOTIVATION AND SAFETY
     10.4.1 Fear and horror or danger and excitement
     10.4.2 Control and self image
     10.4.3 Effort, trouble and convenience
     10.4.4 Job interest
     10.4.5 Danger money, piecework and safety incentives
     10.4.6 Social factors
     10.4.7 Conclusions
10.5 MOTIVATION CHANGE
     10.5.1 Posters, film and informational campaigns
     10.5.2 Laws, rules and disciplinary measures
10.6 CONCLUSION

CHAPTER 11 INDIVIDUAL DIFFERENCES AND SELECTION(点击标题直接阅读PDF)

11.1 INTRODUCTION
11.2 SELECTION, TRAINING AND EXPERIENCE
11.3 INDIVIDUAL DIFFERENCES IN ACCIDENT LIABILITY
     11.3.1 Accident liability and hazard exposure
     11.3.2 Research results
     11.3.3 From problem to prevention
11.4 EXPLAINING ACCIDENT PRONENESS
     11.4.1 Accident proneness and accident classification
     11.4.2 Theoretical and practical considerations
11.5 FACTORS STUDIED
     11.5.1 Demographic variables
     11.5.2 Physical and physiological factors
     11.5.3 Psychophysical factors
     11.5.4 Psychological factors
11.6 CONCLUSIONS

CHAPTER 12 SAFETY BY DESIGN(点击标题直接阅读PDF)

12.1 INTRODUCTION
     12.1.1 Automation and allocation of functions
     12.1.2 Automatic warning systems on trains
12.2 ORGNISATION OF THE CHAPTER
12.3 DESIGN OF PLANT, EQUIPMENT, MACHINERY, TOOLS AND BUILDINGS
     12.3.1 Inherent dangers
     12.3.2 Information intake
     12.3.3 Warnings of danger and deviation
     12.3.4 Design for error tolerance
     12.3.5 Standardisation, stereotypes and workload
     12.3.6 Anthropometrics and comfort (chapters 7,10,11
     12.3.7 Misue and defeating (chapters 7,10,11
     12.3.8 Conclusion
12.4 PHYSICAL ENVIRONMENT
     12.4.1 Distraction
     12.4.2 Fatigue, overload and arousal
     12.4.3 Physical environment: heat, light, noise
     12.4.4 Stress
12.5 DESIGN OF WORK PROCEDURES
     12.5.1 Procedures and crosstalk
     12.5.2 Allocation of responsibility and communication
     12.5.3 Decision support systems
     12.5.4 Accessibility of procedures
     12.5.5 Conclusions
12.6 DESIGN OF ORGANISATIONS
12.7 CONCLUSION

CHAPTER 13 CONCLUSIONS AND FUTURE DIRECTIONS(点击标题直接阅读PDF)

13.1 INTRODUCTION
13.2 SYSTEM DESIGN AND THE HUMAN AS CONTROLLER
     13.2.1 System controllability
     13.2.2 The workings of the human controller
13.3 FUTURE OF THE MODEL
     13.3.1 Status and boundaries
     13.3.2 Research needs
13.4 IMPLICATION FOR PRACTICE
     13.4.1 The approach to prevention
     13.4.2 Analysis of health and safety problems
     13.4.3 Design
     13.4.4 Selection, training and motivation
     13.4.5 Organisation and evaluation

BIBLIOGRAPHY(点击标题直接阅读PDF)

Industrial Safety Series - Volume 2 (1987)
ISBN 0-444-42838-0 (Vol.2)
ISBN 0-444-42749-X (Series)

© A.R. Hale & A.I. Glendon

来源http://www.hastam.co.uk/downloads/publications/hale_and_glendon.html




http://wap.sciencenet.cn/blog-554179-678266.html

上一篇:天文讲座
下一篇:天坛20130405

0

该博文允许注册用户评论 请点击登录 评论 (0 个评论)

数据加载中...
扫一扫,分享此博文

Archiver|手机版|科学网 ( 京ICP备07017567号-12 )

GMT+8, 2021-11-27 17:42

Powered by ScienceNet.cn

Copyright © 2007- 中国科学报社

返回顶部